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Gardens are more than collections of plants. Gardens and Gardeners are intersectional spaces and agents for positive change in our world. Cultivating Place: Conversations on Natural History and the Human Impulse to Garden is a weekly public radio program & podcast exploring what we mean when we garden. Through thoughtful conversations with growers, gardeners, naturalists, scientists, artists and thinkers, Cultivating Place illustrates the many ways in which gardens are integral to our natura ...
 
The Reverend Gilbert White was the curate of the village of Selborne, a village in Hampshire, from 1784 to his death in 1793, living most of his life in the village. The book is in the form of a collection of letters to two friends, discussing the natural history of the areas that he knew, and natural history in general. White's intense curiosity and his love for the world about him flow through his simple, straightforward style, and a gentle sense of humour colours many of his anecdotes. (S ...
 
This podcast series presents recordings of talks given at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History as part of its public programme of events. The Museum of Natural History was founded in 1860, and today it holds an internationally significant collection of natural history specimens and archives. Housed in a stunning neo-Gothic building inspired by the Pre-Raphaelites, the Museum is home to a lively programme of research, teaching and public events.
 
The Natural History of Chocolate being a Distinct and Particular Account of the Cocoa-tree, its Growth and Culture, and the Preparation, Excellent Properties, and Medicinal Virtues of its Fruit. Wherein the Errors of those who have wrote upon this Subject are discovered; the Best Way of Making Chocolate is explained; and several Uncommon Medicines drawn from it, are communicated. - Summary by D. de Quelus
 
With the 2006 acquisition of the Burndy Library (a collection of nearly 70,000 items), The Huntington became one the top institutions in the world for the study of the history of science and technology. In November 2008, The Huntington opened Dibner Hall of the History of Science, which features the permanent exhibition “Beautiful Science: Ideas that Change the World.” It includes galleries devoted to astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light. In lectures and interviews, curators and s ...
 
Naturalis Historia (Latin for "Natural History") is an encyclopedia published circa AD 77-79 by Pliny the Elder. It is one of the largest single works to have survived from the Roman empire to the modern day and purports to cover the entire field of ancient knowledge, based on the best authorities available to Pliny. The work became a model for all later encyclopedias in terms of the breadth of subject matter examined, the need to reference original authors, and a comprehensive index list of ...
 
Sourcing accurate scientific information can be difficult in this age of polarized content. The goal of the podcast is to give you the opportunity to hear directly from the experts, through long-form conservation about natural history and conservation. This podcast is produced by the Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society in partnership with the Oregon Wildlife Foundation. Hosted by John Goodell. John is a wildlife biologist, curator, and conservation educator. He is the President of the Ore ...
 
Join retired Chesapeake Bay Foundation Senior Naturalist John Page Williams every Wednesday for inside accounts of our Bay’s creatures and seasonal events. Follow the Bay through the seasons. Williams' fascinating natural history will enable those who love the Chesapeake to tune in to life around the Bay. The fishing enthusiast will discover things that help him or her catch more bluefish or white perch; the bird watcher and the hiker will learn when to look for the appearance of the ospreys ...
 
From big cities to small towns, museums are everywhere. From natural history to art and everything in between, museums speak to different interests and backgrounds. Now peek behind the curtain and learn more about the museum world. Welcome to The M Files! Listen in as three museum professionals share and discuss professional topics and news impacting the museum world, along with interviews from museum colleagues from across the United States.
 
Broadcaster and naturalist David Attenborough and producer Anthony Geffen discuss the new app, Natural History Museum Alive. The app features some of the museum’s most striking extinct specimens, exclusive footage and imagery, and guidance from David Attenborough himself. Hosted at the Apple Store, Regent Street in London.
 
Arthur Scott Bailey (1877 – 1949) was author of more than forty children's books. Bailey's writing has been described thusly by the Newark Evening News: "Mr. Bailey centered all his plots in the animal, bird and insect worlds, weaving natural history into the stories in a way that won educator's approval without arousing the suspicions of his young readers. He made it a habit to never 'write down' to children and frequently used words beyond the average juvenile vocabulary, believing that yo ...
 
The Outline of Science was written specifically with the man-on-the-street in mind as the target audience. Covering scientific subjects ranging from astronomy to biology to elementary physics in clear, concise and easily understood prose, this popular science work is largely as relevant today as when first published in 1922. In this second volume (of four), we learn about microscopy, and the intricate workings of the human body and mind. The major part, however, is devoted to the Natural His ...
 
"This Day In Weather History" is a daily podcast by The Weather Network that features unique and informative stories from host Chris Mei. Weather Happens Everyday. It can be sunny, cloudy, stormy or maybe just unsettled, but it is always happening! It’s when severe weather strikes that it captures the attention of those affected ...and the imagination of everyone else who follows the story. So it is with good reason to expect that after over a century of news and weather information gatherin ...
 
Every city has its own horrible history. Each week hosts Emily Barlean and Rachel Everett-Lozon will venture to two new cities and do a deep dive into a piece of history that you won't read about in the travel brochures--all the horrible, tragic and traumatic things that have happened in the history of the world.
 
The tides of American history lead through the streets of New York City — from the huddled masses on Ellis Island to the sleazy theaters of 1970s Times Square. The elevated railroad to the Underground Railroad. Hamilton to Hammerstein! Greg and Tom explore more than 400 years of action-packed stories, featuring both classic and forgotten figures who have shaped the world.
 
It’s the 1990s in the Pacific Northwest. A march of chainsaws clear-cuts the country’s last available ancient forests. Protesters bury themselves in front of bulldozers and spend months sitting in the tallest trees in the world. And at the center, the northern spotted owl becomes the most controversial bird in the country. The "Timber Wars" podcast tells the story of how this conflict reshaped the Northwest and the nation as a whole, and transformed the way we see—and fight over—the natural ...
 
Think is a daily, topic-driven interview and call-in program hosted by Krys Boyd covering a wide variety of topics ranging from history, politics, current events, science, technology and emerging trends to food and wine, travel, adventure, and entertainment.
 
YOUR TV IS LYING TO YOU - Students of Knowledge, Eastern Philosophy, History, Conspiracy, Leadership, Truth, Self Realization -Strategy - Knowledge is liberation. The whole world is in a state of fear and mind control. The only way to overcome Fear is Love. The Family and the Tribe are now under assault. Divide and conquer has the world at war for Oil Natural resources and world domination. We all need to Unite and allow love to unite us all. Your TV and the main stream Media is Lying to you.
 
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Through the many twists and turns of life, hers including a life-threatening battle with an auto-immune disorder and lung cancer, Claire’s organizing ethos has become: “Go Gently."An environmental advocate before turning to flowers as her life path, Claire is also the author/co-creator of a new book entitled “The Healing Power of Flowers”, which lo…
 
In this episode the team discusses the odd phenomenon of spontaneous human combustion. Sources for this episode - wikipedia.org/wiki/Death_of_Michael_Faherty wikipedia.org/wiki/Spontaneous_human_combustion #cite-note-Yotam Aviram-9 wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornelia_Zangheri_Bandi “Ley lines,” article in the Wikipedia website, 2010, http://en.wikipedia.or…
 
If you've ever wondered how Krys chooses who she talks to or what she wants to talk about, this is your chance to find out. Every weekend Krys will share highlights from the conversations she had that week and offer a behind the scenes look at the creation process of Think. On this week’s episode: How children’s drawings are a look into their thoug…
 
The game was a joke...fog rolled out ahead of a massive rainfall that ended things after only 7 innings. There were 2 out in that 7th inning, wth and runners on 2nd and 3rd that's when Kelly Gruber stepped up and the rest is a bit foggy. This story reads like one of my old Hardy Boys novels; it would have been called “the night the ball disappeared…
 
On June 12, 2014 a hail storm that hit Abilene produced more than $400 million in insured losses to vehicles, homes and commercial property. "This is the worst storm damage I've seen in my 41 years in the insurance business," Leroy Perkins of the Perkins Insurance Agency in Abilene, told the largest state insurance trade association in the United S…
 
Black artists have contributed immeasurably to American culture – but having their voices heard hasn’t always been easy. This hour, host Krys Boyd talks about gatekeeping and Black expression with a prominent attorney who works with Black artists to sign fair contracts, a writer who mined her own experiences in the music industry for her latest Y.A…
 
June 11, 2008 marks the tragic loss of 4 teenagers at a Boy Scout camp near Little Sioux, Iowa; 48 more were injured. The tragedy struck at the 1,800-acre camp about an hour north of downtown Omaha. An EF3 tornado, with 145 mph winds, descended on the remote camp, striking and leveling a cabin where campers had sought shelter as warnings of the sto…
 
The writing of the Second Amendment codified a system where Black people could not own guns while white enslavers could. Carol Anderson is the Charles Howard Candler Professor and Chair of African American Studies at Emory University. She joins host Krys Boyd to discuss gun ownership in America and how expanding that right often leaves out Black ci…
 
Sammy Safari was recently awarded the prestigious Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature. Sammy is leading an effort to help save sea turtles off the coast of Kenya. Sea turtles have been poached off Kenya for many years, with a dramatic increase seen with the Covid pandemic. The loss of tourism in Kenya has pushed locals out into the ocean…
 
With assistive technology, people with disabilities have options to help navigate the world. Devi Lockwood is an assistant editor at Rest of World, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about significant advancements in technology that can help users hear, see, and talk, and what’s standing in the way of those advancements reaching the people who co…
 
This week Rachel takes on some of Russia's most recognizable historic figures -- the Romanovs. She also says the word "cock" about 100 times in reference to Rasputin. You've been warned. Then, Emily tells the little-known story of Paul Fronczak, a one-day-old baby stolen from a Chicago hospital. Hopefully, you're horrified. Content/Trigger Warnings…
 
Benjamin Franklin, inventor of bifocal glasses, the Franklin stove, one of those that wrote the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, ambassador, Governor of Pennsylvania, on June 10 1752 in Philadelphia, flew a kite during a thunderstorm and collected an ambient electrical charge in a Leyden jar, enabling him to demonstrate the connect…
 
We can swipe left or swipe right to find the next best option, but these choices rarely add up to commitment. Pete Davis joins host Krys Boyd to talk about why, in a world of endless choices, true freedom comes when we finally make a decision. His book is called “Dedicated: The Case for Commitment in an Age of Infinite Browsing.”…
 
Children ask a lot of questions, and too often we dismiss them instead of embracing their wonder. Jana Mohr Lone is director and founder of the University of Washington’s Center for Philosophy for Children. She joins host Krys Boyd to talk about why children offer unique viewpoints on life’s philosophical mysteries, and why it’s important to take t…
 
Are rays fish? What is the difference between rays and skates? What are the dangers of catching rays? How do you catch one safely? Can you eat them? John Page Williams answers these and other questions about Chesapeake Bay dwelling cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) on this episode of Chesapeake Almanac. Please rate and review, it really helps us to…
 
The tornado outbreak of 9 June 1984 is among the most important tornado events in Russia’s history because it was associated with substantial loss of life with 400 deaths, and contained one of two F4 tornadoes ever recorded for in that country. Very little information is available on a violent tornado outbreak that swept through areas north of Mosc…
 
In honor of Sea Turtle Week, we decided to return to sea turtles and specifically cover the largest of the group, the Leatherback. This sea turtle dwarfs their distant relatives and can reach over 6.5 feet (2 meters) and weigh nearly a ton (900 kg). They are enormous! Not to mention they are one of the deepest diving animals (outside of fish), amon…
 
When Civil Rights leaders are trying to get an idea across to Americans, a common strategy is to get American allies abroad onboard with the same idea. Brenda Gayle Plummer is a professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about the deeply rooted tradition of fighting anti-Black racism by appeali…
 
Today’s episode features stories from Omaha and NYC! A supplement to our longer Horrible History episodes, this weekly tiny episode will focus on ridiculous, lighter crime stories from the years 1987-present. Each week we’ll share Terrible Today stories featuring news articles from the places we visited in the previous week’s main episode. Contact …
 
The 1953 Flint–Worcester tornado outbreak was a devastating tornado outbreak sequence spanning three days, two that featured tornadoes each causing at least 90 deaths—an F5 occurring in Flint, Michigan on June 8, 1953, and an F4 in Worcester, Massachusetts the next day. The Worcester storm stayed on the ground for nearly 90 minutes, traveling 48 mi…
 
When complex social justice ideas get reduced to a single word or phrase, they become easy to weaponize. Nesrine Malik is a columnist and features writer for the Guardian, and she joins host Krys Boyd to talk about how “wokeness,” “political correctness,” “free speech,” “cancel culture” and other shorthand terms are used to both drive and tamp down…
 
As lockdowns spread across the country last spring, the economy tanked. But the aftermath wasn’t as bad as predicted. New York Times economics reporter Ben Casselman joins host Krys Boyd to talk about what was predicted for the nation’s fiscal health, why the ripple effects weren’t as far reaching as they could’ve been, and who could still use a li…
 
On June 7 1984, nine people died and 200 were injured when a tornado slammed into the Iowa County, Wisconsin community of Barneveld. The F5 twister destroyed 90% of the town of 580 residents. What made Barneveld’s tornado rare is it hit overnight. A majority of tornadoes occur between 3 and 9 p.m., and violent tornadoes almost never happen late at …
 
David Sinclair is a geneticist at Harvard and author of Lifespan. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Onnit: https://lexfridman.com/onnit to get up to 10% off – Clear: https://clearme.com/lexpod and use code LexPod to get 2 months free – National Instruments (NI): https://www.ni.com/perspectives – SimpliSafe: https://simplis…
 
If you've ever wondered how Krys chooses who she talks to or what she wants to talk about, this is your chance to find out. Every weekend Krys will share highlights from the conversations she had that week and offer a behind the scenes look at the creation process of Think. On this week’s episode: 5 tips for being a better communicator. Featured co…
 
Rainfall totals in the northeastern United States from January through the end of May 1925 had only reached half the normal total in most cities. This meant, at least for the first 5 months of the year the climate was more like patched central Texas than the lush and green landscape of the eastern seaboard. Heating of the lower atmosphere takes pla…
 
Two and a half-years after slavery was outlawed, the news made its way to Galveston, Texas. The occasion has been a state holiday since 1980 and many cities across the country now commemorate Juneteenth. Harvard historian Annette Gordon-Reed grew up in Texas, and she joins host Krys Boyd to discuss the history of Texas exceptionalism, an economic m…
 
The Atacama Desert of Northern Chile one the the most inhospitable places on planet Earth. Rainfall totals of 1-2mm/year is normal. 30-50mm would therefore take a generation to fall, not in 24 hours. This region is rich in mineral and copper mines because of it’s hot and dry conditions. It simply does not rain here….well except for that ONE time ba…
 
On June 4, 1976 a strong Tropical Cyclone, known in the US as a Hurricane, hit the port cities just north of Mumba on the west coast of India. In the decades prior to the storm, massive Tropical Cyclones has battered both the west and east coasts of India with huge waves and heavy rains resulting in massive flooding and tremendous loss of life. Alo…
 
The third and final part of the Bowery Boys Road Trip to Long Island -- the gay history of Fire Island! Fire Island is one of New York state’s most attractive summer getaways, a thin barrier island on the Atlantic Ocean lined with seaside villages and hamlets, linked by boardwalks, sandy beaches, natural dunes and water taxis. (And, for the most pa…
 
Dr. Lucy Kemp was recently awarded the prestigious Whitley Award from the Whitley Fund for Nature. Dr. Kemp is leading a grassroots effort to help save and preserve the amazing Southern Ground-hornbill in Africa. Her story gives us so much hope for the future for not only the Southern Ground-hornbill, but all wildlife in Africa and beyond. Her proj…
 
A pint after work now and then might be more than a comforting habit — it could be evolution. Edward Slingerland is distinguished university scholar and professor of Asian studies at the University of British Columbia, as well as co-director of the Centre for the Study of Human Evolution, Cognition and Culture. He joins host Krys Boyd to discuss wh…
 
The top 1 percent of American earners has an income share more than the bottom 40 percent of all households. Vox senior reporter Emily Stewart joins host Krys Boyd to talk about who benefits from tax policy and to make the case that important infrastructure updates could be paid for if we had the political will to adjust the tax code. Her article i…
 
Vitalik Buterin is the co-founder of Ethereum. Please support this podcast by checking out our sponsors: – Athletic Greens: https://athleticgreens.com/lex and use code LEX to get 1 month of fish oil – Magic Spoon: https://magicspoon.com/lex and use code LEX to get $5 off – Indeed: https://indeed.com/lex to get $75 credit – Four Sigmatic: https://fo…
 
Debra Prinzing is the founder and leader of The Slow Flowers Society – She joins Cultivating Place in this first week of summer (after Memorial Day in the US and before the Summer Solstice in a few weeks) to share more about the many facets of her passion for being a voice for the floral world.Debra Prinzing is the founder and leader of The Slow Fl…
 
We Need a world class stadium, they said! It needs to have a roof to protect us from the weather, they said! It needs to stay open for the sun then close for the rain they said! In 1989 it was complete. We need a splashy opening ceremony broadcast all over Canada so all can see our wonder of engineering they said! Yeah…..that looked good on paper, …
 
This week Rachel honors her upcoming / past trip to Nebraska by talking about Louise Vinciquerra, a lady criminal and bootlegger that was Omaha's baddest bitch back in the day. Then, Emily goes to New York, New York and tells the infamous story of Typhoid Mary, aka Mary Mallon, aka patient zero for Typhoid in many, many households in NYC in the ear…
 
What started out as just another day in June in Colorado in 1921, rapidly turned into one that would never be forgotten in the town of Pueblo, Colorado. A cloudburst enveloped the town the afternoon of June 3, 1921. During a typical cloudburst, over half an inch of rain may fall in a matter of minutes, and that is exactly what happened in Pueblo, c…
 
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