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Dylan Ratigan is a former news anchor and commentator for CNBC and MSNBC, and former executive at Bloomberg News. Dylan Ratigan is a world-renowned business leader and author of a best-selling book on concrete solutions for increasing investments, jobs, and opportunities in America. In 2012, Dylan invested his life savings and founded a company that designs modern farming kits to assist military veterans in operating small farms.
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When politicians buy options or stock and those trades are profitable, it's natural to wonder if they are trading on non-public information and gaining an unfair advantage. Sure, there's an argument to be made legislators should trade so they understand markets. But if trading and understanding leads to the appearance of impropriety and a corrupt g…
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There is no place in life where being passive leads to success. Finance is no different. However, there are plenty of people out there who will tell you different. Who will tell you it's too hard. Who will tell you financial media is going to hurt your finances. The truth is a little different because at a minimum, financial media generates engagem…
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Artificial intelligence is improving at a pace we can no longer really control. It's evolution on steroids. Today, there are companies that can use publicly available information to replicate your thoughts. Want to have dinner with John Kennedy? No problem. Want to know what Abraham Lincoln thinks about the state of our politics? Just ask. But what…
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Tom Sosnoff and Dylan Ratigan dissect Elon Musk's recent legal tussle, in which he sought a hefty share compensation from the Tesla board, a request promptly dismissed by a discerning judge. Despite their typical pro-innovator stance, Tom and Dylan agree with the judicial decision. Delve into this episode of Truth or Skepticism to unravel their com…
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There's a perception out there that individual self-directed investors need to be protected from themselves. Take the recent bitcoin ETFs. Mainstream media is saying individual investors got left holding the bag. But did they? The truth is investors have been long bitcoin for year and used the ETF launches to take profits. Also this week, are regul…
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If you invest in a company because you believe in the founder, are you investing in a company or are you investing in the person? Take it a step further. Imagine that founder comes back and says they have another business idea and want more money or else they'll develop the new business on the side. Is that blackmail or is it a fair ask? That's the…
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Is social media really a threat or is it just a scapegoat? Each generation thinks the next generation is being dumbed down by media consumption. Social media is the most recent battlefield. There is evidence that social media is addictive and has the ability to affect decision making as a result of curated feeds. On this week's episode Tom argues s…
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We all like a good story. There's nothing wrong with that. However, when we trust the story at the expense of the facts, we have a problem. Markets are the ultimate deciders. The information available in a liquid marketplace ultimately gets parsed down, resulting in prices reflective of true value. Outside of the market; however, facts have become …
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We're in the midst of a transformative era of personal finance. Whether it's sports betting, crypto, or equity and futures markets, self-directed retail investors are more engaged than ever. Members of the old guard, like Charlie Munger, are passing away after decades long careers that allowed them to achieve guru-like status. The question becomes,…
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In a recent Bloomberg column, a startling revelation emerged: Financial institutions now generate a staggering 90% of their new revenue from asset price increases, rather than from attracting fresh clients. The truth is becoming clear – most financial institutions are heavily reliant on the significant 10% of their clients for a whopping 90% of the…
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Why are bonds down so much this year when stocks are up? If they’re both looking at the same world, you would think they would trade similarly. On this week’s episode, Dylan asks Tom to explain the discrepancy. Tune in to hear Tom’s explanation and why he thinks Dylan is a victim of the types of questions old men ask.…
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The most common reason we hear about people being passive investors is fear of risk. Risk of the unknown. However, we’ve dedicated our professional careers demonstrating outlier risk rarely happens and even when it does hit, markets absorb and recover almost immediately. War. Pandemic. Markets have a resiliency that’s a function of their efficiency…
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Scan a handful of newspaper headlines and you might thing the world is worse off than it’s ever been. Now look at a chart of the stock market over the last 9 months and you’ll have a different takeaway. On this week’s episode Tom admits to being “public” and wrong about what the market truly reflects. Also, in light of the strikes in the auto indus…
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If you have a set of unique talents, there’s no better time to look for a job or ask for better compensation than at a time when the labor pool is nearly empty. Unemployment is well below 4% and the number of people seeking jobs is small. Should we really be surprised labor unions are threatening to strike or already striking? Also, what’s driving …
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We’re seeing governments intervening in markets on multiple continents. In China, state employees have been banned from using foreign mobile phones. In Europe, the EU enacted new regulations with hopes of spurring competition. Are these moves out of desperation or just low hanging fruit for regulators looking to say they’re fighting for the little …
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